DESIGNTEAM

SALVADOR

      DIAZ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Luis Alberto Salcines

Exposición Individual "El Principe"

MAS Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Santander. Verano 2009

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Manuel Olveira

"O Futuro da Actualidade"

CGAC

Centro Galicia de Arte Contemporánea.

Santiago de Compostela, Spain

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Jorge Contreras

Catalogo Serie Nuestro Arte. Salvador Díaz

 

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Luis Alberto Salcines


Individual Exhibit "El Principe"

MAS Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Santander. Summer 2009

By Luis Alberto Salcines


Salvador Díaz extracts phrases from which he elaborates his aesthetic-critical arguments. The literary inspiration as a trigger of his creations centers his visual arts production. Over spread-out newspaper pages with news of everyday life, of the reality our tumultuous
society of today is living and that he selects with the appearance of a casual encounter, of a current event that comes to the encounter with the reader, he extends oil paint or juxtaposes clippings of other newspapers or magazines. The graphic images that appear on the printed press face those that Salvador Díaz traces with his brushes. The same happens with the text. Newspaper and magazine headlines, framed or underlined with brushstrokes, are answered with the inscriptions from the artist. The scissors that cut the papers and the brushes
that extend the oil paint are transmitters of the Mexican artist pictorial language.


In the selection of images and text, there is a clear intention of criticism and denouncement, which is evident when reading the titles of the paintings. In some works, the political overtones are more explicit. Violence, eroticism, war, racism, the printed media, center Salvador Díaz’s interest, who mixes irony and drama when playing with the texts and images, which he rescues with an ownership attitude, with the figurative and gestural graphics or his own personal artistic universe. There is a strong presence of symbols in some of his pieces that contribute to highlight even more this denouncement sought by the artist. The ravens and the association with scavenger birds, Uncle Sam’s hat as an icon of the overwhelming American imperialism, the erotic connotations of the image of the woman’s legs and the
possible references to the market. The spectator doesn’t remain indifferent before these compositions, they provoke certain uneasiness, as Salvador Díaz’s accomplices to the situations he denounces and the feelings they induce. At the same time, he unintentionally establishes an association with walls in the great cities, with the posters pasted over them, their improvised collages and decollages, the spontaneous graffiti that plays with the images that survive the weather, the critical messages directed to rushed citizens as shouts that come out of
the wall, giving shape to a mural that is being created and destroyed simultaneously. In Salvador Díaz’s pieces there is, however, control over their execution and an intention in the suggested references, providing them with a communication dimension that true works of art have.

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Manuel Olveira


"O Futuro da Actualidade"

CGAC

Centro Galicia de Arte Contemporánea.

Santiago de Compostela, Spain

 

 

SALVADOR DÍAZ

Similar to Francesc Ruiz, Pauline Fondevila and Cisco Jiménez, the Mexican painter Salvador Díaz also utilizes the filter of that which remains personal as a reaction to the press landslide and the weight of the conventional media machinery. In his case, the strategy consists on using the support of different printed communication media to relate his automatic drawings and paintings with the articles that fill the newspaper pages on that specific date.

His work is accumulative and takes shape as a certain way of uncontainable reaction in which Salvador Díaz (Mexico, 1977) unleashes his visceral impulses before the pack of ads, the constant depiction of politicians and businessmen, and the mayhem of catastrophes, wars and conflicts around the world. On one hand, he has a very peculiar way of reading the newspapers (as he superimposes his reading as an iconic code of reality) and of reacting before these newspapers (because his drawings end up being an emotional register of his reactions, anger, reflections and impulses).

As automatic writing and an uncontainable need to overlap his presence over the media’s presence, the artist builds an ample and convoluted fresco where he mixes advertisement with information of very varied makeup, the vital register with his fears and ghosts, the collective imaginary generated by the insistence and ubiquity of these press images accompanied by the small and insignificant graph we use to personalize, customize and digest through a personal code everything that the media offers us as a daily menu.


Manuel Olveira

Director of the Centro Galicia de Arte Contemporánea, CGAC. Santiago de Compostela.


SALVADOR DÍAZ
De la misma manera que Francesc Ruiz, Pauline Fondevila y Cisco Jiménez, el pintor mejicano Salvador Díaz también emplea el filtro de lo personal como reacción a la avalancha de la prensa y al peso de la
máquina mediática convencional. En su caso, su estrategia consiste en emplear el soporte de diferentes medios de comunicación impresa para relacionar sus dibujos y pinturas automáticas con las noticias que ese día llenan
las páginas de los periódicos.

Su trabajo es acumulativo y se forja como una especie de reacción incontenible en la que Salvador Díaz (México,
1977) da rienda suelta a sus pulsiones viscerales ante la sarta de imágenes publicitarias, ante la secuencia de imágenes de políticos y empresarios, y ante el cúmulo de catástrofes, guerras y conflictos a nivel mundial. Por una
parte la suya es una manera muy peculiar de leer la prensa (ya que sobrepone a la misma su lectura en clave icónica de la realidad) y de reaccionar ante ella (porque sus dibujos acaban siendo un registro emocional de sus reacciones,
cabreos, ensimismamientos y pulsiones).

A modo de escritura automática y de incontenible necesidad de sobreponer su presencia a la presencia mediática, el artista construye un amplio y enrevesado fresco en el que se mezcla la publicidad con la información de
muy variado pelaje, el registro vital con sus miedos y fantasmas, el imaginario colectivo generado por la insistencia y la ubicuidad de algunas imágenes de prensa con el pequeño e insignificante grafismo con que personalizamos, customizamos y digerimos en clave personal todo lo que los medios nos ofrecen como menú cada día.

 

Manuel Olveira

Director del CGAC Centro Galicia de Arte Contemporánea. Santiago de Compostela.

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Jorge Contreras

La búsqueda


(It was already known)


The strategy of liberty is contagious, but it has seven roads with different conditions. We always take the longest, with the most complicated and multiple paths.

We won’t get closer by taking shortcuts, walking faster, flying, looking for a way to travel the seven roads at the same time, etc. It will only postpone the moment when we have to come to terms, through an always unexpected instant of lucidity, with the scarce possibilities of understanding our own experience.

What gives way to the instant of lucidity when we discover ourselves? What causes the disjointed ensemble of actions by which we delay the moment of looking at ourselves? And what if –as Octavio Paz questioned– we are not who we think we are…


Christian Boltanski
spent several months retrieving clothes from dumpsters and putting them inside a bag. You could see him as a beggar on the street collecting trash. He also received clothes from friends or acquaintances. Each night, when he was back at
his studio, he took the clothes out of the bags to identify: woman, about 36 years; youngster, 21 years; kid, 11 years; baby, etc. He got to the point he was walking around every day and sometimes he didn’t even collect any clothes, he just wandered around with his bag or sat down on a bench to feed the doves, hear the bustle of some nearby public place or just to sit there. He became a real vagabond.


After several months, when he received the proposal to mount an exhibit, he presented part of the collected clothes placed on shelves. This work takes us to the presence of those that used them by bringing back their absence to the present.

On another hand, those clothes had to do with the people that used it, but they were also testimony of Christian Boltanski’s activities as a vagabond. And so, what difference is there between the famous artist who had been an art professor in Paris and the beggar under his same name? Were they the same person, or is it possible to decide another way of being in the world? Is it possible to modalize the own
presence and risk becoming another? 


I believe that in Salvador Díaz’s work there is a similar project to Christian Boltanski’s exercise. The transformation, becoming another person, is not only a search on the possibilities of painting, but is a methodical ontological quest. And Ithink Salvador Díaz’s is aware of the result of his quest:
 
                                                                                             The fog became increasingly thick, the road more and more   

                                                                                             inescrutable. Some people build labyrinths, others get lost in them


                                                                                                                                                             László Földényi

 

 

Salvador Díaz’s work seems like the timetable of a permanent desire for liberty to inhabit each of his days. Maybe this is the reason that the different roads he has travelled have the appearance of a standstill process, of an approximation strategy to other lives, other languages and other works. Maybe he does so as a protection from himself, delaying with certain pleasure the moment he deciphers himself.
However, his work pieces provide keys that lead him to this discovery.

 

 

The narrative


In Girl with crow, an albino girl seems to emerge from a white armchair covered by words that could describe the character’s temperament, her decisive gaze reveals a willingness to make the world explode; even though her foot lies barefoot over the red carpet, separating her from the bullet-covered floor and the water that threatens to flood the room. An ambience of terror controlled by the painter predominates through the girl’s caress of the crow. Her caressing this bird seems to signal a slow accumulation of silent resentment. This is how Salvador Díaz achieves to portrait an emotional command that eventually overwhelms us all.


On another hand, in this painting the crow besides being a mascot has a symbolic role. According to old beliefs this bird can predict the future. The future of violence is always near, and the girl in the painting seems to know this, together with the artist
that portraits more an affective condition than a scene. In many of his paintings, Salvador Díaz meets this objective, expressing complex emotions through narrative images.


 (It was already known) 


                                                                                                                               At that time I was fleeing  from myself                                                                                                                                                       Cees Nooteboom

 

 

In La magia del universo a model is in the painter’s study, her self-absorption leads us to think that she isn’t where her body is but where her thoughts are. But, where is the painter? On top of a ladder, looking from a window or imagining how a bird flying by would see this.

The point of view, in which the painter invites the spectator to participate as a voyeur, and there’s a certain ambience in which the silence is thick, reminds of Edward Hopper’s paintings. However, in Salvador Díaz’s work the objects seem to have life, the books and flowers possess a symbolic air to them, as if they wished to mean more than what they did. And the mystery comes from the model’s attitude that
contemplates with a type of light sphere that acts as a mirror on top of a computer. A strange gesture within its context, but charged with meaning to decipher the motives that lead Salvador Díaz to paint, and of course the best recipient of this clue is himself.

The model’s attitude works as a trigger to infer one or ten possible stories, the immediate past and the possible futures. The closest is a character that contemplates itself in silence. Observing our own life helps us to be more tolerant to others, its teaches us to admit the legitimization of other people’s desires. In this type of works from Salvador Díaz there is an intimate ethical concern.


Familia en la playa also reminds us of Hopper’s characters. The children’s faces seem not finished, the girl is covering her ears probably not to hear the tractor’s noise working behind the family, the mother is looking sideways questioning the photographer, the father looking elsewhere and the kid towards the sand, self-absorbed, concentrated in his own experience. These are
also clues to build a sepia-colored ambience that seems to make reference above all to the emotions that the image brings to the painter. This painting from Salvador Díaz overcomes the representation and is able to say melancholy.


In his 1883 essay on the melancholy of art, László Földényi attributes the melancholic temperament
to the possibility of provoking in the artists the mirage of a world dominated by desire above reason, a world that has a body, and that is accessed only by exploring that which produces pleasure and hunger in us. I believe that Salvador Díaz’s painting is a threshold that ties and liberates him at the same time, it is the razor’s edge that separates him from who he wishes to be.


(It was already known)


Memory comes before desire. We invent a past based on the future we wish, we construct ourselves and elaborate strategies to look at ourselves. What is the distance between the life we invent for ourselves and the one we live? Broadening or reducing this distance determines our temperament and gives us a way to see, sometimes crystal-clear, sometimes in a fog.


In Salvador Díaz’s paintings, the awareness of this renovated exercise that consists in looking in a certain way to be able to clean the way we look is evident. Maybe it’s better than looking at oneself in the mirror, to practice multiple glances in which our own future and our own desires come into play.


In La siega del heno, a title and topic that has been addressed by many artists, one of the most outstanding is from Julián Dupré (1888), Salvador Díaz seems to propose multiple and complex stories. A man with angry face sits fixing a huge scythe, while a couple is
surprised by two girls that look like each other’s copy. Why is the couple surprised? What do the girls carrying rakes say and represent? On another hand, what relation can be established between the couple and the old man sitting near them?


Three possible starting points for the story. The girls know something, they carry a mystery besides its replication, a news that must surprise the couple but not the man with the scythe, even though one of the girls has lines on her, similar to an image in a failing monitor. Maybe the composition of the picture’s story is broken, and in reality these are three different narrations assembled in such a
way that they appear in one same painting. If this is the case, which are the limits of the image to express a story? Here Salvador Díaz’s skill consists in proposing a relationship with the spectator by including him in the work. He asked the spectator to build his/her own way of looking at the picture; and perhaps in doing so is ultimately proposing that the spectator set out in the exhausting task of cleaning his/her sight and be able to see him/herself as spectator.


  

The dialogue


 
Even though Salvador Díaz’s painting analyzed with pleasure the configuration of an internal order, and at the same time explores the values of interpretation; in it there is a passionate project to change the way comprehension works, not understanding it
as an adaptation but as a construction of its own object, and of the artist as a subject that suffers with fortitude his own glance.


Each painting weaves a semantics of solitude, of silence, of absence, achieves an approximation to a state of consciousness submerged in a permanent present, the past and future lose meaning giving way to the complete presence, concentrated in its own experience, and in the way it speaks of itself.


In a certain way, Salvador Díaz invents himself in each painting and in each drawing, renovating the exercise of glancing to himself, and building strategies to come closer to his desires and understand his presence.


The importance of his tenacity in this exercise is that it leads to the full reflection on the working of that we call mind.
Normally our thoughts invent a beginning and end to order experiences, builds sequences of recognizable actions, gestures, attitudes, emotions, in order to maintain interest in the world. But in Salvador Díaz’s work we can see that thought is also desire, and in a good measure a desire for dialogue. Therefore, his work consists on achieving the daily construction of an aesthetic experience, this is, achieve coherence between the way we live and the way we desire to live, achieve a coordination with whom we live and a feeling of
adequate connection with the world.


In Descendimiento de Cristo, the artist undertakes a virtuous exercise, an extraordinary copy of Descent from the Cross by Rubens in 1611-1614. In Salvador Díaz’s painting Christ's image is decomposed through a forced lengthening in Dalí’s style, as a body that unfolds on itself, a body that is displaced until it almost detaches itself, but the result is that it duplicates itself. A double replication role.

 


(It was already known)


Identity is always mimesis.


Salvador Díaz’s work accounts for that extraordinary will that consumes him through the paintings and drawings, that pushes him to transform himself into the self he has seen pass by in dreams, in the artist that he senses and desires, and while he pursues himself he becomes himself, because in his quest there is no arrival point or end, only a compelling anguish to return to the canvas, to the
following theme, to his brushes.


As in Christian Boltanski’s exercise, Salvador’s painting is a way to construct himself while he looks to make himself comprehensible to the world. What is painting and what does it mean to have brushes and paint in your hands? Whas is the meaning of making an image appear on a canvas? I believe Salvador Díaz’s work has as starting point the most essential questions in a painter’s endeavor, here
resides its interest; and its importance will appear on the roads that this young artist undertakes throughout his career.


It is convenient to start looking for the exit doors, it is convenient to arrive late or early to that instant of fracture when it seems we are freeing ourselves from our attachment to ourselves. I believe Salvador Díaz leaves himself in each painting, to try to reconcile with something that affects him very intimately, that consumes him and moves him at the same time.

  

The newspapers




A large part of the intensive exploration that conforms Salvador Díaz’s work is done on newspapers, not to use a paper base, but to dialogue with their images, their texts, their design, the issues they bring up and the ultimate meaning of the dissemination of ideas.


These works not only adventure into a fascinating way of understanding the graphical sphere, but also provide a rigorous conceptual tension, calmly propose an alternation of our habits and our ways of linking with what is happening to us as a community,
and establish painting as a resource to reflect upon that which we accept as an occurrence.

 

Examining the ultimate meaning of newspapers, Salvador finds the anguish, pain and daily happiness that defines the theme of each day. He bets on embarking on a journey through the shapes we consider adequate or acceptable to understand the communication
with other individuals, and he enters within the terrain of public knowledge. 


 

(It was already known)


If how we see is a historic artifact and product of our own everyday life, these works by Salvador Díaz propose we restructure how we assume that something is news. What determines that an action must be known and commented by other people?


His intervention in newspapers is a way to intervene in the public knowledge, it is a way to react before a news item, but it is also a way to express a desire to participate in this knowledge.


This exercise works as an ironic comment on the possibilities of art to theme life. Crimes, tragedies, natural disasters, opinions, news on politicians and bureaucrats, gossip on actors and actresses, sports, etc., shape our conversation themes and modalize
how we interact for a brief moment, because even though the effects of a news item could be so unpleasant, it is soon substituted by another item, another event, another opinion.


Above all that vertigo of themes that occupy newspapers and coexistence, we find art. This seems to be the origin of Salvador Díaz’s intervention, and before occupying himself with public issues, there is the glance that directs itself towards the interior.

 

In his first mural on newspapers, exhibited in 2005 in Houston, we find comments to the news articles, images and the idea itself of news. It seems to make reference to the possibility of a community mind. What guarantees that in reading something all people will understand the same thing? What guarantees that in finding a written name, readers will recognize the same person?


The possibility of a contract or collective agreement to establish limits of interpretation and use of the information is questioned in these works. The 1992 discussion between Umberto Eco and Richard Rorty on supposed interpretation criteria is famous.
The conclusion was that even the most orthodox reading of a phenomenon implies it is given already a use.

 
As with a virus, ideas infect others and the mind shapes itself through the contact with other people. Through conversations and encounters, it sets the limits between what is adequate, pertinent and what is impossible to think. Therefore, in this type of
works, Salvador Díaz has found the best support to explore the possibilities of finding spaces of freedom for the collective mind.


These innumerable interventions on newspapers present an ample record, from very direct connotations: Freud’s Portrait, Big Apple;
to the critical participation: Niño de suéter blanco (Boy with white sweater); comments on the situation of a
project: 26 days to unhappiness; up to circumstances in which the artist seems affected, moved: Niña Madrid (Madrid Girl).

  

 
                                                                                                                                                               In all people I see myself

                                                                                                                                                                     Walt Whitman



There is an ethical connotation in Salvador Díaz’s work, expressed by the desire of creating a dialogue and contact with others. When we talk, we superficially put into play meanings and messages, but deep inside we wish to coordinate our emotions through consensual conducts, and meaning emerges from this coordination. In the dialogue that Salvador Díaz’s artwork pieces establish with the newspapers, we can sense the radical hope of transforming others into us.


The capacity of observing others as companions, through the reflection on the themes that circulate as part of public knowledge, is an exercise of freedom that broadens our sensibility to the specific details of the pain or happiness of others. This extraordinary enterprise undertaken by art seems to be part of the will that motives Salvador Díaz’s work. As in Boltanski’s work, he is in transformation to widen the possibilities of his life and, it was already known, meets Whitman as a result: in all people he will see himself, eventually
will become someone else, the one that gives himself completely in each work, that risks his own way of seeing; the one that shapes himself through the possibilities of art.



Jorge Contreras

 

 

 

Salvador Díaz

  
La búsqueda

 

(Ya se sabía)

 

La estrategia de la libertad es el contagio, pero tiene siete caminos con diferentes condiciones; siempre nos corresponde el más largo, el de múltiples y complicados senderos.


No nos acerca dar la vuelta a los atajos, andar mas aprisa, volar, buscar la manera de andar los siete caminos al mismo tiempo, etc., eso solo posterga el momento de asumir, mediante un gesto siempre inesperado de lucidez, las escasas posibilidades de comprender nuestra propia experiencia.


¿Qué es lo que da origen al momento de lucidez en que nos descubrimos? ¿Qué provoca el abigarrado conjunto de acciones mediante las cuales postergamos el instante de mirarnos? Y, si acaso –como preguntó Octavio Paz- no fuéramos quien creemos…


Christian Boltanski dedicó varios meses a recoger ropa de los basureros, la guardaba en un saco; se le podía ver en la calle como un pordiosero recogiendo basura, también aceptaba ropa que le obsequiaban amigos o conocidos. Cada noche que regresaba a su estudio, sacaba la ropa de los sacos para identificarla: de mujer aproximadamente 36 años, joven 21 años, niño 11 años, bebé, etc.  Las caminatas se le hicieron cotidianas y a veces, no recogía ropa ni nada, solamente andaba con su saco, o se sentaba en alguna banca para dar de comer a las palomas, oír el bullicio de algún sitio público cercano, o simplemente para estar sentado, se convirtió en un verdadero pordiosero.


Después de varios meses, cuando le propusieron hacer una exposición, presentó parte de la ropa recogida puesta en estantes. Esa obra remite a la presencia de quienes la usaron mediante la actualización de su ausencia.


Por otra parte, esa ropa tenía que ver con las personas que la usaron pero también era testimonio de la actividad de pordiosero de Christian Boltanski. Y ¿qué diferencia había entre el artista famoso que fue profesor en la escuela de arte de París y el pordiosero que llevaba su nombre? ¿Acaso eran la misma persona, o quizá es posible decidirse a estar de otra manera en el mundo? ¿Es posible modalizar la propia presencia y arriesgarse a ser otro?


Me parece que en el trabajo de Salvador Díaz hay un proyecto similar al del ejercicio de Christian Boltanski, transformarse, convertirse en otra persona, no es sólo una búsqueda sobre las posibilidades de la pintura sino una metódica indagación ontológica. Y creo que Salvador Díaz es conciente del resultado de su búsqueda:

                                                                                                                                          

                                                                                                                                            La niebla se tornó cada día más densa,

                                                                                                                                               el camino cada vez más inescrutable,

                                                                                                                                          Algunas personas construyen laberintos,

                                                                                                                                                                   otras se pierden en ellos


                                                                                                                                         László Földényi

 

 

El trabajo de Salvador Díaz parece el itinerario de un permanente deseo por lograr que la libertad habite cada una de su jornadas. Quizá por ello, los distintos caminos que ha ido transitando mantienen un aspecto de proceso detenido, y de estrategia de aproximación a otras vidas, a otros lenguajes y otras obras, quizá para guardarse de sí mismo, postergando con cierto placer el momento de descifrarse; sin embargo, sus piezas le otorgan claves que le permiten irse descubriendo.


 

La narración



 

En Girl with crow, una niña albina parece emerger de un sillón blanco cubierto por palabras que podrían describir el carácter del personaje, cuya mirada decidida revela una voluntad de hacer estallar el mundo; aunque tiene un pie descalzo sobre la alfombra roja, que la separa del piso cubierto de cartuchos de bala, y del agua que amenaza con inundar la habitación. Predomina el ambiente de terror controlado por el pintor mediante la caricia de la niña al cuervo, la caricia a esta ave parece señalar una lenta acumulación de rencor silencioso, de esta manera Salvador Díaz Logra muy bien el retrato de un dominio emocional que eventualmente nos agobia a todos.


Por otra parte, en esta pintura la figura de cuervo además de mascota tiene una función simbólica, según algunas creencias antiguas esta ave puede predecir el futuro. Futuro de violencia se avecina siempre, y la niña del cuadro parece saberlo, junto al artista que retrata una condición afectiva más que una escena. En muchas de sus pinturas, Salvador Díaz cumple bien este objetivo, expresar emociones complejas mediante imágenes narrativas.


(Ya se sabía) 

 

Por esas fechas
andaba

 

huyendo de mí mismo

 

Cees Nooteboom

 

En La magia del universo, una modelo aparece en el estudio del pintor, su ensimismamiento hace pensar que no está donde su cuerpo sino donde sus pensamientos, pero ¿dónde está el pintor? Subido
a una escalera, mirando desde una ventana, o imaginando cómo mira un pájaro que pasa.

 

La perspectiva, en la que el pintor invita al espectador a participar como voyeur, y un cierto ambiente donde el silencio es denso, recuerda pinturas de Edward Hopper. Sin embargo, en la obra de Salvador Díaz los objetos parecen tener vida, los libros o las flores tienen un aire simbólico, como si quisieran significar más de lo que son; y el misterio proviene de la actitud de su modelo que contempla una especie de esfera de luz, que hace las veces de espejo sobre una computadora. Gesto
extraño en su contexto, pero cargado de significado para descifrar los motivos
que llevan a Salvador Díaz a pintar, desde luego el mejor destinatario de esta
clave es él mismo.


La actitud de su modelo funciona como disparador para inferir uno o diez posibles relatos, el pasado inmediato y los futuros posibles, lo más próximo es un personaje que se contempla en silencio; observar nuestra propia vida nos enseña a ser mas tolerantes con otros, nos enseña a admitir la legitimidad de los deseos de otras personas. En este tipo de obras de Salvador Díaz hay una íntima preocupación ética.

 

Familia en la playa, también recuerda personajes de Hopper, los rostros de los niños parecen sin terminar, la niña que se tapa los oídos probablemente para no oír el ruido del tractor que trabaja atrás de la familia, la mamá mirando de lado interrogando al fotógrafo, el padre mirando a otra parte y el niño hacia la arena, ensimismado, concentrado en su propia experiencia, son también claves para ir construyendo un ambiente sepia que parece hacer referencia sobre todo a las emociones que la
imagen trae a colación para el pintor, esta pintura de Salvador Díaz va más allá de la representación y logra decir melancolía.


En su ensayo de 1883 sobre la melancolía en el arte, László Földényi atribuye al temperamento melancólico la posibilidad de provocar en los artistas el espejismo de un mundo dominado por el deseo antes que por la razón, un mundo que tiene cuerpo, y al que se accede solo por la exploración de aquello que nos produce placer y hambre. Creo que la pintura de Salvador Díaz es un umbral que lo sujeta y lo libera al mismo tiempo, es el filo de navaja que lo separa de quién desea ser.

 

(Ya se sabía)


La memoria es antes deseo, inventamos un pasado de acuerdo con el futuro que queremos, nos construimos a nosotros mismos y elaboramos estrategias para mirarnos. ¿Cuánta distancia hay entre la vida que nos inventamos y la que vivimos? Ampliar o disminuir esta distancia determina nuestro carácter y nos otorga una manera de mirar, eventualmente diáfana, eventualmente en brumas.


En las pinturas de Salvador Díaz es evidente la conciencia de este renovador ejercicio que consiste en mirar de cierta manera que se procure limpiar la mirada. Quizá sea mejor que mirarse en el espejo, ensayar múltiples miradas en las que vaya en juego nuestro propio futuro y nuestros deseos.


 
En La siega del heno, título y tema que han abordaron numerosos artistas, una de las más sobresalientes es la de Julián Dupré (1888), Salvador Díaz parece proponer múltiples y complejos relatos, un señor con gesto enfadado en el rostro permanece sentado arreglando una enorme guadaña, mientras una pareja resulta sorprendida por dos niñas que parecen cada una copia de la otra. ¿Qué sorprende a la pareja? ¿Qué dicen y que representan las niñas cargando rastrillos? Por otra parte, ¿Qué relación se puede establecer entre la pareja y el viejo sentado cerca de ellos?


Tres posibles puntos de partida para el relato, las niñas están enteradas de algo, llevan un misterio consigo además de su réplica, una noticia que debe sorprender a la pareja pero no al señor de la guadaña, aunque una de las niñas tiene rayas sobre sí, como una imagen de monitor que falla, quizá la
composición del relato en la pintura está rota, y en realidad son tres distintas narraciones ensambladas de tal manera que aparecen en una sola pintura. Si es así, ¿cuáles son los límites de la imagen para expresar un relato? Aquí el acierto de Salvador Díaz de proponer una relación con el espectador que lo incluye en el trabajo de la obra, le pide que construya su propia manera de mirar la pintura; y quizá con ello le propone en el último caso, que emprenda la agotadora tarea de limpiar su mirada para lograr verse a


                                                                                                                                                                   En todos los hombres me veo

Walt Whitman

 

En la obra de Salvador Díaz hay una manifiesta connotación ética, expresada por el deseo de diálogo y contacto con otros. Cuando conversamos ponemos en juego superficialmente significados y mensajes, pero en el fondo buscamos coordinar nuestras emociones mediante conductas consensuales, el significado emerge de esa coordinación; y en el diálogo que las piezas de Salvador Díaz establecen con los diarios, se intuye la esperanza radical de convertir el otros en un nosotros.

 

La capacidad de observar a otros como compañeros, mediante la reflexión sobre los temas que circulan como parte de un conocimiento público, es un ejercicio de libertad que amplía nuestra sensibilidad a los detalles particulares del dolor o de la alegría de otros. Esta extraordinaria empresa del arte parece formar parte de la voluntad que motiva el trabajo de Salvador Díaz. Como en el caso de Boltanski, está en transformación para ampliar las posibilidades de su vida y, ya se sabía, conoce como Whitman el resultado: se verá en todos los seres humanos, eventualmente será otro, el que se entrega en cada obra, el que arriesga su propia forma de mirar, el que se construye mediante las posibilidades de la pintura.


Jorge Contreras